Dietary Fibre Forms

                     In our earlier article on Vital Dietary Fibre, we identified the dietary fibres and the importance of them. In this article, we will focus on various forms of dietary fibres and dietary needs.                      Basically, we have two types of dietary fibres based on the working mechanisms of dietary fibres as- Insoluble and soluble. Both types of fibre are beneficial for the body. The differences between the two are: Insoluble dietary fibres: Insoluble dietary fibres help in removing the wastes through our intestine by adding bulk to faeces. Major insoluble dietary fibre forms include cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. They make up the structural parts of plant cell walls.                  … Read More

Continue Reading

Major enzymes, functions and sources

                   As we know from our earlier article on enzymes, that enzymes play a decisive role in food digestion by playing a role in the chemical changes (breaking up of carbohydrates, fats and proteins or converting complex substances into simple ones for intestines) undergone by food during digestion. Enzymes also help in the utilisation of simple substances for building up new tissues and producing energy.                     Enzymes are very specific and do the particular job only. Thus it becomes important to identify the enzymes, its chemistry and the working requirements. Some of the important and known enzymes are: Ptyalin: Just like starting of digestion process from the mouth, Ptyalin enzyme… Read More

Continue Reading

Food Combining Rules

Foods with which concentrated protein foods should not be combined: The first and most important rule of food combining is to avoid mixing of concentrated protein and carbohydrate foods. Protein concentrated foods demand the longest digestive time. Stomach keeps them for hours (usually 3 to 6 hours, based on complexity/type of protein present) until the gastric juices have performed its task. On mixing of concentrated protein foods with starch-concentrated or sugar-concentrated foods, fermentation is likely to occur. Indigestion and gas problem are the common symptoms of it. Animal-food proteins require very high concentration of hydrochloric acid in gastric juices. The presence of fermented carbohydrates greatly inhibits the gastric digestion of… Read More

Continue Reading

Food Combining

What is food combining?                   Food combining is a scientifically developed food selection system, from among different food types, based on the compatibility and incompatibility to each other. Food combining is mainly used for ensuring after-meal comfort and keep digestion efficient. But it can also be used to treat or avoid certain health anomalies or to improve overall health. Around 90% of digestive system disorders are caused by poor food combining of mutually incompatible foods options. Why is it important?                     Our digestion system involves not just some chemical or physical processes, but it is also a physiological thing. It involves our mind, having a psychological effect. Before getting… Read More

Continue Reading

Enzymes

Enzymes are the marvellous organic catalysts produced inside living organisms, participating and controlling the essential chemical reactions of our life, without going any change during chemical reactions. Based on the number of bodily processes requiring enzymes, the human body is estimated to have over 20,000 enzymes. But all enzymes are yet to be identified. What is Enzyme? Enzymes are defined as the globular proteins that catalyse a biological chemical reaction. Enzymes are protein molecules made from a chain of amino acids. Enzymes are present inside each cell of plants and animals. They are produced inside our living cells, but they are not dependent upon the vital processes of the cell… Read More

Continue Reading

Molybdenum

                       Molybdenum is a metallic element, playing a useful role in our body. Its availability depends primarily on the presence of molybdenum in soil and having a diet with food products grown in the presence of nitrogen fixing bacteria. The benefits, damages and dietary requirements of molybdenum are still a matter under study, thus limiting our information on all functions of molybdenum, as a health vital. Usage by body:                       Molybdenum serves as an important cofactor in the functioning of various enzymes by facilitating the enzyme breakdown, thus helping in metabolism. Molybdenum has a vital role in sulfur absorption; in return, sulfur helps our body in detoxification and removing the… Read More

Continue Reading

Manganese

An adult human body contains only 30 to 35 mg of manganese, but its distribution is throughout the tissues. Manganese can be found inside our bones, liver, pancreas, kidney and pituitary glands. In terms of availability, manganese is found in the form of manganese salts (sulfate and gluconate) and manganese chelates (aspartate, picolinate, fumarate, malate, succinate, citrate, and amino acid chelate) for consumption. Usage by Body: Manganese is used our body for absorption of calcium, helping in the creation and maintenance of bone structure integrity. Manganese nourishes our nerves and helps brain in the coordination of nerve impulses and muscular actions. Manganese reduces nervous irritability and helps in the formation… Read More

Continue Reading

Copper

                 In terms of presence in our body, copper ranks far higher than many macro minerals. But the low daily dietary needs make it a micro/trace mineral. An adult human contains anywhere between 75 to 150 mg of copper inside. Among infants, its concentration is more, but the micro intakes reduce its concentration with age. Usage by body:                  Copper is present in all body tissues and plays an important role in our body systems. Kidney, liver, heart, brain, and hair are the regions with a relatively higher concentration of copper. It is important for the formation of connective tissues and the working of immunity and nervous system.                   Copper… Read More

Continue Reading

Rh-Blood Group System

Rh-blood group system is one of the 35 human blood group systems known today. Medically it was first observed in 1939 blood transfusion serum agglutination, though identified by Karl Landsteiner and his associate Alexander Wiener in 1937. Subsequent findings of Philip Levine and Rufus Stetson gave identification to the Rh (short for rhesus) factor having two major alleles of D antigen ‘R’ or ‘+ve’ (present) and ‘r’ or ‘–ve’ (absent) on the surface of red blood cells. Today Rh-blood group is the second most important blood group, after ABO, and used with ABO blood group in blood transfusion and identification of blood incompatibility/hemolytic disease (erythroblastosis fetalis) risk to newborn. Till… Read More

Continue Reading

Selenium and Silicon

Selenium:                Selenium works with vitamin E to slow down ageing and hardening of tissues by oxidation. The male body requires more selenium than female. USAGE BY BODY:               It is mainly stocked in testicles and seminal ducts (adjacent to prostate gland). It is used by our body to keep the youthful elasticity of tissues, alleviate distresses of hot flashes and menopause, and in treating dandruff. DEFICIENCY DISEASES:             Deficiency of selenium is related to loss of stamina, decrease in immunity and improper thyroid functioning. DIETARY REQUIREMENTS:             We… Read More

Continue Reading